Meet the Commissioners 

Marion Buller

Chief Commissioner

Chief Commissioner Buller is Cree and a member of the Mistawasis First Nation in Saskatchewan. In 1994, Chief Commissioner Buller was the first Indigenous woman appointed as a Provincial Court Judge in British Columbia. She retired as a judge in 2016. Prior to being appointed to the Provincial Court, Chief Commissioner Buller worked in civil and criminal law. She was Commission Counsel for the Cariboo-Chilcotin Justice Inquiry. Chief Commissioner Buller has served as President and Director of the Indigenous Bar Association in Canada, the B.C. Police Commission, the Law Courts Education Society and the Law Foundation of British Columbia.

Chief Commissioner Buller has lectured and written extensively about Indigenous issues and rights. In 2006, she initiated the First Nations Courts in British Columbia.

Chief Commissioner Buller received both her undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Victoria.

Michèle Audette

Commissioner

The daughter of a Quebecois father and an Innu mother, Commissioner Audette grew up in an engaged environment at the confluence of two rich cultures, which she proudly represents.

Commissioner Audette entered politics at a young age, first as president of the Quebec Native Women’s Association and then as associate deputy minister for the Status of Women in the government of Quebec.

Commissioner Audette then made the leap to the national scene as president of the Native Women’s Association of Canada. Her tireless efforts have helped to advance the cause of women and families. L’École nationale d’administration publique recently sought her expertise to help create an innovative program on Indigenous public policy.

Brian Eyolfson

Commissioner

Commissioner Eyolfson has a B.Sc. in psychology and an LL.B. from Queen’s University, and an LL.M. specializing in administrative law from Osgoode Hall Law School. He was called to the Bar of Ontario in 1994.

Prior to his appointment, Commissioner Eyolfson was Acting Deputy Director in the Legal Services Branch of the Ontario Ministry of Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation. He was also a Vice-Chair with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, where he adjudicated and mediated human rights applications between 2007 and 2016. Commissioner Eyolfson was also a Senior Staff Lawyer with Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto where he practiced human rights, Aboriginal and administrative law before a variety of tribunals and the courts. He also represented Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto at the Ipperwash Inquiry, and previously served as Counsel to the Ontario Human Rights Commission.

Commissioner Eyolfson was a member and Co-Chair of Rotiio> taties, an Aboriginal advisory group to the Law Society of Upper Canada. He was also an Editor of the Journal of Law and Social Policy, and taught human rights law and practice to community legal clinics in Ontario. Commissioner Eyolfson is a member of Couchiching First Nation.

Marilyn Poitras

Commissioner

Commissioner Poitras has an L.L.B. from the University of Saskatchewan and an L.L.M. from Harvard Law School. She is also a graduate of the Native Law Summer Program. She comes to the National Inquiry from the University of Saskatchewan where she has taught at the College of Law since 2009. Born and raised in the southeast corner of Saskatchewan, Commissioner Poitras traces her origins through her father’s Michif family, who lived in a road allowance community, and through her mother's Irish roots.

Commissioner Poitras has worked as a court worker, a constitutional lawyer, a self-government negotiator, a teacher and an educational designer for community and institutional programs. She is a student of traditional laws and learns from Elders all over the world, has worked on land issues for Indigenous people in Canada and in the Philippines and produced a film on stalking that Indigenous women face in Canada.

Qajaq Robinson

Commissioner

Commissioner Robinson is a graduate of the Akitsiraq Law Program – a partnership between the University of Victoria and Nunavut Arctic College. Born in Iqaluit and raised in Igloolik, Commissioner Robinson is a strong Northern advocate, who is fluent in Inuktitut and English. She articled at Maliiganik Tukisiiniakvik, clerked with judges of the Nunavut Court of Justice under then-Chief Justice Madame Justice Beverley Browne, and then became a Crown prosecutor who worked the circuit court in Nunavut for four years.

Prior to her appointment Commissioner Robinson was an Associate with Borden Ladner Gervais LLP in Ottawa, Ontario, where she worked on Team North, a multi-disciplinary team of 70 lawyers who do a variety of work throughout the northern parts of the provinces and in the territories.

Commissioner Robinson has worked on a wide range of issues affecting Indigenous rights. Most recently, she worked as legal counsel at the Specific Claims Tribunal, travelling to First Nations communities across Canada. In addition, Commissioner Robinson was a member of the Board of Directors of Tungasuvvingat Inuit, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to providing cultural and wellness programs to Inuit in Ottawa.